Building the Future: Residents of Mwatate Get A Taste Of Wildlife Works REDD

Residents of the town of Mwatate have joined the other Taita County communities who can say, without a doubt, that environmental conservation pays well. The latest project funded by carbon credits, which was officially opened on June 8th, is expected to increase the community’s enthusiasm for taking care of the environment.

The project involved building a modern classroom at Mwatate secondary school, which cost approximately $10,000 (Ksh 800,000). Taita Taveta County’s Deputy Governor, Mrs. Mary Digha, was guest of honor at the event and hailed the classroom, which can accommodate up to 40 students, as being in line with the Ministry of Education’s specifications for building classrooms.

Grand Opening

“The Kenya Ministry of Education requires that classrooms be large enough to accommodate many students who are joining the public schools,” Mrs. Digha said.

Mrs. Mary Digha (left) Deputy Governor Taita-Taveta County, with Mrs. Lenjo-headmistress, Mwatate Secondary School during the opening of the building.
Mrs. Mary Digha (left) Deputy Governor Taita-Taveta County, with Mrs. Lenjo-headmistress, Mwatate Secondary School during the opening of the building.

The new classroom at Mwatate Secondary School is just the icing on the cake. There are numerous other Wildlife Works projects currently in progress around the towns of Mwatate and Mwachabo. The projects include the construction of a classroom valued at $9,000 at Mngama Primary School, the construction of a staff room, classroom and toilet facilities at Shigadi ya Mwemba Primary School, the building of a water chamber and rehabilitation of the existing water pipeline at Ngangu and the allocation of school bursaries to needy students.

Mngama Primary School will receive a new classroom.)
Mngama Primary School will receive a new classroom.

The Residents of Mwatate have also applauded the speed at which Wildlife Works responded to an emergency that left one school in the area without a roof. Muzanwenyi Primary School was at the receiving end of a gusty wind that left it roofless, calling for the intervention of our skilled builders. Wildlife Works deployed a team to carry out the repairs, and the construction team is still camping at the school until they finish installing a more reinforced roof.

Roofless School

After a windy storm left Muzanwenyi Primary School without a roof, Wildlife Works sent a construction team to repair the school.
After a windy storm left Muzanwenyi Primary School without a roof, Wildlife Works sent a construction team to repair the school.

In total, the Mwatate community, which joined the Wildlife Works REDD+ Carbon Project in 2011, has been able to initiate projects worth more than $150,000 in the past year with a high percentage of this amount going towards offering bursaries to students. Funding for these projects and bursaries is obtained directly from the sale of carbon credits. There is therefore a need for the community to continue protecting trees and looking after the local wildlife-rich Mgeno Ranch, in Mwatate.

2 Replies to “Building the Future: Residents of Mwatate Get A Taste Of Wildlife Works REDD”

  1. It’s nice to see revenue from carbon credits being applied to real problems with real people reaping the rewards… What a great success this and many other stories from Wildlfe Works represent. Corporates, keep on offsetting; this is where you dollars are going, as opposed to sending Big NGO executives to more conferences. This system really is making the world a better place!

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